05/21/16

SUMMER DAYS + SUMMER NIGHTS | Blog Tour

I’m incredibly honored and excited to be on the blog tour for Stephanie Perkin’s new anthology, Summer Days and Summer Nights! It’s perfect for a summer day (as mentioned in the title) and is just what I’ve been needing in these days when the end of school is coming faster than I can think.

Today, I have a Q&A with Stephanie, and I’m super excited for you to read!


Summer Days GIF Novel: Summer Days & Summer Nights: Twelve Love Stories  edited by Stephanie Perkins | Goodreads
Release Date: May 17th, 2016
Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin

Internationally bestselling author Stephanie Perkins brought together some of her closest friends and fellow bestselling young adult authors for the holiday anthology My True Love Gave to Me that a starred Publisher’s Weekly called “a rare holiday treat” and Romantic Times claimed “this is what all anthologies should aspire to be”. Now, she’s doing it again with SUMMER DAY AND SUMMER NIGHTS: Twelve Love Stories (St. Martin’s Griffin / On Sale: May 17, 2016), another anthology filled with twelve new stories from a superstar lineup of young adult authors. Already receiving rave reviews, this anthology is the perfect beach companion for those long, hazy summer days. Featuring twelve brand new short stories from:

  • Stephanie Perkins (Anna and the French Kiss, My True Love Gave To Me)
  • Leigh Bardugo (Six of Crows, The Grisha Trilogy)
  • Francesca Lia Block (Love in the Time of Global Warming)
  • Veronica Roth (The Divergent Trilogy)
  • Lev Grossman (The Magicians Trilogy)
  • Cassandra Clare (The Mortal Instruments Series)
  • Jennifer E. Smith (The Statistical Probability of Falling in Love, The Geography of You and Me)
  • Libba Bray (A Great and Terrible Beauty)
  • Tim Federle (The Great American Whatever)
  • Nina LaCour (Everything Leads to You, You Know Me Well)
  • Jon Skovron (Misfits, Man Made Boy)
  • Brandy Colbert (Pointe)

SUMMER DAY AND SUMMER NIGHTS, written by twelve bestselling young adult writers and edited by the international bestselling Stephanie Perkins, will have you dreaming of sunset strolls by the lake. So set out your beach chair and grab your sunglasses. You have twelve reasons this summer to soak up the sun and fall in love.

Q&A

  • What was it like working on this project compared to the first one, My True Love Gave To Me? Is it easier to do the editing and collaborations with other authors now that you have experience from the first one?

This one was significantly harder. The first anthology felt like a fluke—something with my friends, just for fun! A lot more planning went into this one. I’d already been a critique partner to several of the authors in the holiday anthology, so they were used to working with me. I’d already earned their trust.

With the summer anthology, I reached out to a lot of authors whose work I admired, but I didn’t personally know them as well. Relationships had to be established. That takes time. But the work was great fun, and I loved getting to know them, and it was a tremendous honor for these incredibly talented authors to have trusted me with their work. I’m so, so grateful.

  • This is the second anthology you’ve edited. What was the inspiration? What did you give your contributing authors in the way of guidance or prompting as they began their stories?

The inspiration for the second anthology was . . . the first anthology. Working with my friends was such a joy, and I relished the opportunity to work with eleven new authors. All of them had so much to teach me both as an author and an editor. I’m always looking for opportunities to become better at my craft. Pulling apart these stories, inspecting their seams, digging in deeper—it’s a brilliant way to learn new tricks. And I’m a good editor, so I think/hope that my work was helpful for them, too.

I gave the authors only three guidelines: Their story had to take place during the summer, romantic love had to be involved, and—no matter how dark the situation got—it had to end on a note of hope.

  • Why did you decide to bring these particular authors together for this anthology?

I reached out to authors who are writing stories that I love. All of them have strong voices and—whether or not they primarily write romance—a kind and romantic heart.

The crazy and fantastic thing is that there are literally dozens of other YA authors who also fit this description. There are so many talented, inspiring writers in this industry! I had to make some tough decisions, and a lot of it just came down to keeping a balance between the genres.

  • Your contribution to this collection is a new story featuring Marigold and North (previously seen in My True Love Gave to Me). What was it like revisiting these characters? Did you always know that there would be more to their story? Will there be more in the future?

I’m not sure if I always knew a continuation of their story was worth telling, but I did know where their future was headed. In the early days, I was working under the assumption that I wouldn’t HAVE another chance write about them, so I was trying not to think about it too much. If that makes sense.

But . . . I have a hard time letting go of characters. I always have. So when the summer anthology came to fruition, I knew immediately that I would continue their story. Now, I’m happy with how I’ve left them. In the first story, North helped to heal Marigold. This time, she helped to heal him. They’re good.

  • How does editing a short story collection compare to writing a full-length novel? Did your process as an author influence your process as an editor?

It’s easier. A lot easier. I only had to come up with original content for 1/12th of the 400 pages! My writing process is slow and generally agonizing, so . . . yeah. It’s just not even close.

But it’s a huge part of the reason why I love to edit. I’m a slow drafter, and I prefer the tinkering, shimmering stages of editing and revising. It’s where a good story becomes great. My nitpicky brain loves working on that level—finding a better word, a tighter theme, a more developed character, a more textured setting. And I absolutely love helping other authors to find their own deeper, truer stories.

I think most authors become a better editor as they become a better writer. I’m the opposite. I started off with stronger editorial skills, and, as they improve, they’re helping me to become a better writer.

But, being an author, I will say that when I’m wearing my editorial hat, I heap a LOT of praise onto the other authors. I leave tons of notes for them in the margins and mark every single passage or phrase that I love. Writing is difficult work, and I always appreciate it when my own editors take the time to mark their favorite bits. Praise also shows me how to revise my work! It teaches me which parts are the good parts! And that’s revising in a nutshell: adding more good parts, removing the bad parts.

  • What are your favorite summer love stories?

Several of the authors in my two anthologies have written swoony summer romances. A few that immediately spring to mind: I’m pretty sure all of Jennifer E. Smith’s books take place over summer (The Geography of You and Me is a favorite), as well as Nina LaCour’s The Disenchantments and Everything Leads to You, and Jenny Han’s Summer series, starting with The Summer I Turned Pretty

  • Do you have any go-to summer books you like to re-read summer after summer?

I’ll recommend one of my mother’s favorite summer reads: Sarah Dessen’s Keeping the Moon. It might be my favorite Dessen novel, too.

  • If you had to pair Summer Days and Summer Nights with a summer-y drink, what would it be?

Watermelon juice. It’s so simple—it’s just watermelon that’s been put into a blender, but it’s heaven.

  • In other interviews you’ve described yourself as an introvert. What does your writing space look like? How do you organize a typical writing day?

Yes. I’m very introverted, and I’m very comfortable being alone. I’d love to be one of those cool, coffee-shop authors, but I need silence to write.

My office is in my house. It has lime green walls and a bold pink desk. (If I remember correctly, the name of the paint was “Sweet Sixteen Pink.”) My desk is covered with trinkets from loved ones, and my shelves overflow with research books and foreign editions of my own novels. There are also a lot of tiny, creepy items—animal skulls and teeth. I have a dark sense of humor.

I wear noise-cancelling headphones, and I start work at ten o’clock in the morning. I work for four hours. Five, if it’s going well. After that I stop, because I’m prone to burnout. Then I’ll eat a late lunch, and then I’ll answer email or pop on social media until my husband comes home.

But if I’m nearing the end of a deadline, all of these rules are thrown out, and I work around the clock until it’s done. And then I crash for about two weeks.

  • What books from your younger years as a reader contribute to your stories now as a writer?

Francesca Lia Block’s Weetzie Bat was hugely influential on Lola and the Boy Next Door, which was the first novel that I worked on. Lola wouldn’t exist without Weetzie. My first published book, Anna and the French Kiss, was largely influenced by the voices of Meg Cabot, John Green, and Maureen Johnson. And everything I write has been influenced by my love of fairy tales and happily-ever-afters.

  • What can we expect to see from you next? Are there any plans of releasing a new full-length novel soon?

My next novel is a teen slasher, which hopefully (if I finish it on time!) will be published next year. I’m having such a blast writing in the horror genre. And it’s honestly not as big of a departure as it seems. There’s still an attractive boy, an intriguing setting, and quippy friends. It just also contains a lot of murder.

  • If readers could take away one thing from having read Summer Days And Summer Nights what would you hope it would be?

It always sounds corny, but . . . hope is the hope. No matter what’s going on in your life right now—and as teenagers, so much of your life is out of your own control—it will get better. You’ll get more control, you’ll get to make more choices. Make good choices. Learn from your mistakes. I promise—with every single fiber of my heart—that life gets better. There is always hope.


I hope you all enjoy Summer Days & Summer Nights as much as I did!

05/18/16

THE ONLY THING WORSE THAN ME IS YOU | Blog Tour

I’m super excited to be sharing The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You by Lily Anderson – a debut book that is perfect for the summer time! I have an excerpt from the book below, and let me know in comments if you’re as excited about this book as I am.


The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is YouNovel: The Only Thing Worse Than Me Is You by Lily Anderson | Goodreads
Release Date: May 17th, 2016
Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin

Trixie Watson has two very important goals for senior year: to finally save enough to buy the set of Doctor Who figurines at the local comic books store, and to place third in her class and knock Ben West–and his horrendous new mustache that he spent all summer growing–down to number four.

Trixie will do anything to get her name ranked over Ben’s, including give up sleep and comic books–well, maybe not comic books–but definitely sleep. After all, the war of Watson v. West is as vicious as the Doctor v. Daleks and Browncoats v. Alliance combined, and it goes all the way back to the infamous monkey bars incident in the first grade. Over a decade later, it’s time to declare a champion once and for all.

The war is Trixie’s for the winning, until her best friend starts dating Ben’s best friend and the two are unceremoniously dumped together and told to play nice. Finding common ground is odious and tooth-pullingly-painful, but Trixie and Ben’s cautious truce slowly transforms into a fandom-based tentative friendship. When Trixie’s best friend gets expelled for cheating and Trixie cries foul play, however, they have to choose who to believe and which side they’re on–and they might not pick the same side.


EXCERPT

Ben West spent summer vacation growing a handlebar mustache.

Seriously.

Hovering over his upper lip—possibly glued there—was a bushy monstrosity that shouted, “Look out, senior class, I’m gonna tie some chicks to the train tracks and then go on safari with my good friend Teddy Roosevelt. Bully!”

            I blindly swatted at Harper with my comic book, trying to alert her to the fact that there was a mustachioed moron trying to blend in with the other people entering campus.

“I know I should have made flash cards for the poems that Cline assigned,” she said, elbowing me back hard, both acknowledging that she wasn’t blind and that she hated when I interrupted her monologues about the summer reading list. “But I found Mrs. Bergman’s sociolinguistics syllabus on the U of O website and I’m sure she’ll use the same one here.”

The mustache twitched an attempt at freedom, edging away from West’s ferrety nose as he tried to shove past a group of nervous looking freshmen. It might have been looking at me and Harper, but its owner was doing everything possible to ignore us, the planter box we were sitting on, and anything else that might have been east of the wrought iron gate.

“So,” Harper continued, louder than necessary considering we were sitting two inches apart. “I thought I’d get a head start. But now I’m afraid that we were supposed to memorize the poems for Cline. He never responded to my emails.”

Pushing my comic aside, I braced my hands against the brick ledge. The mustache was daring me to say something. Harper could hear it too, as evidenced by her staring up at the sun and muttering, “Or you could, you know, not do this.”

“Hey, West,” I called, ignoring the clucks of protest coming from my left. “I’m pretty sure your milk mustache curdled. Do you need a napkin?”

Ben West lurched to a stop, one foot inside of the gate. Even on the first day of school, he hadn’t managed to find a clean uniform. His polo was a series of baggy wrinkles, half tucked into a pair of dingy khakis. He turned his head. If the mustache had been able to give me the finger, it would have. Instead, it stared back at me with its curlicue fists raised on either side of West’s thin mouth.

“Hey, Harper,” he said. He cut his eyes at me and grumbled, “Trixie.”

I leaned back, offering the slowest of slow claps. “Great job, West. You have correctly named us. I, however, may need to change your mantle. Do you prefer Yosemite Sam or Doc Holliday? I definitely think it should be cowboy related.”

“Isn’t it cruel to make the freshmen walk past you?” he asked me, pushing the ratty brown hair out of his eyes. “Or is it some kind of ritual hazing?”

“Gotta scare them straight.” I gestured to my blonde associate. “Besides, I’ve got Harper to soften the blow. It’s like good cop, bad cop.”

“It is nothing like good cop, bad cop. We’re waiting for Meg,” Harper said, flushing under the smattering of freckles across her cheeks as she turned back to the parking lot, undoubtedly trying to escape to the special place in her head where pop quizzes—and student council vice presidents—lived. She removed her headband,  pushing it back in place until she once again looked like Sleeping Beauty in pink glasses and khakis. Whereas I continued to look like I’d slept on my ponytail.

Which I had because it is cruel to start school on a Wednesday.

“Is it heavy?” I asked Ben, waving at his mustache. “Like weight training for your face? Or are you just trying to compensate for your narrow shoulders?”

He gave a half-hearted leer at my polo. “I could ask the same thing of your bra.”

My arms flew automatically to cover my chest, but I seemed to be able to only conjure the consonants of the curses I wanted to hurl at him. In his usual show of bad form, West took this as some sort of victory.

“As you were,” he said, jumping back into the line of uniforms on their way to the main building. He passed too close to Kenneth Pollack, who shoved him hard into the main gate, growling, “Watch it, nerd.”

“School for geniuses, Kenneth,” Harper called. “We’re all nerds.”

Kenneth flipped her off absentmindedly as West brushed himself off and darted past Mike Shepherd into the main building.

“Brute,” Harper said under her breath.

I scuffed the planter box with the heels of my mandatory Mary Janes. “I’m off my game. My brain is still on summer vacation. I totally left myself open to that cheap trick.”

“I was referring to Kenneth, not Ben,” she frowned. “But, yes, you should have known better. Ben’s been using that bra line since fourth grade.”

As a rule, I refused to admit when Harper was right before eight in the morning. It would just lead to a full day of her gloating. I hopped off of the planter and scooped up my messenger bag, shoving my comic inside.

“Come on. I’m over waiting for Meg. She’s undoubtedly choosing hair care over punctuality. Again.”

Harper slid bonelessly to her feet, sighing with enough force to slump her shoulders as she followed me through the front gate and up the stairs. The sunlight refracted against her pale hair every time her neck swiveled to look behind us. Without my massive aviator sunglasses, I was sure I would have been blinded by the glare.

“What’s with you?” I asked, kicking a stray pebble out of the way.

“What? Nothing.” Her head snapped back to attention, knocking her glasses askew. She quickly straightened them with two trembling hands. “Nothing. I was just thinking that maybe senior year might be a good time for you to end your war with Ben. You’d have more time to study and read comics and…”

Unlike the tardy Meg, Harper was tall enough that I could look at her without craning my neck downward. It made it easier to level her with a droll stare. Sometimes, it’s better to save one’s wit and just let the stupidity of a thought do the talking.

She rolled her eyes and clucked again, breezing past me to open the door.

“Or not,” she said, swinging the door open and letting me slip past her. “Year ten of Watson v. West starts now. But if one of you brings up the day he pushed you off the monkey bars, I am taking custody of Meg and we are going to sit with the yearbook staff during lunch.”

“I accept those terms,” I grinned. “Now help me think of historical figures with mustaches. Hitler and Stalin are entirely too obvious. I need to brainstorm before we get homework.”


This book is out today and is SERIOUSLY worth the buy. Go forth and purchase!

05/14/16

Book Review: The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love

20522640Novel: The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love by Sarvenaz Tash | Goodreads
Release Date: June 14th, 2016
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Format: E-ARC
Source: Publisher via Edelweiss

Peter Parker and Gwen Stacy…

Archie and Veronica…

Althena and Noth…

…Graham and Roxy?

Graham met his best friend, Roxana, when he moved into her neighborhood eight years ago, and she asked him which Hogwarts house he’d be sorted into. Graham has been in love with her ever since.

But now they’re sixteen, still neighbors, still best friends. And Graham and Roxy share more than ever—moving on from their Harry Potter obsession to a serious love of comic books.

When Graham learns that the creator of their favorite comic, The Chronicles of Althena, is making a rare appearance at this year’s New York Comic Con, he knows he must score tickets. And the event inspires Graham to come up with the perfect plan to tell Roxy how he really feels about her. He’s got three days to woo his best friend at the coolest, kookiest con full of superheroes and supervillains. But no one at a comic book convention is who they appear to be…even Roxy. And Graham is starting to realize fictional love stories are way less complicated than real-life ones.

I’m a self-professed nerd.

This meant that this book = one of the best things ever.

I’m not a comic book nerd, but I still highly appreciate the community, so I was still able to enjoy reading about Graham and Roxy and friends’s experiences at Comic Con. So, if you don’t read comics, never fear! You’ll still be engrossed in the story.

I immediately related to Graham. His lack of experience in the dating department, the pining for a girl he’s loved for forever, and his desire to make the moment he tells her his feelings absolutely perfect. I got his desire for it to be comic book (or in my case, book) perfect. What Graham quickly realizes is that in real life, things don’t always happen like you want. People get in the way (cough cough British Devin cough cough), things don’t go according to plan (not getting the tickets to the event he was planning to impress Roxy with), and people don’t respond the way you hope.

A lot of the book is about Graham coping with things not going according to plan, and also coming to terms with the possibility that Roxy may not feel the same way. His growth as a character made me love him even more – he evolved from this boy who was pining after his best friend to someone who has experience and has learned how to deal with rejection. With the backdrop of Comic Con, the story line was even better! It heightened the geek love and was such a unique setting for a book.

Basically, I loved this book. A lot. 

I loved Graham’s geeky weirdness. I loved Roxy’s outfits and her art skills. I loved Casey and his obsession with his grades. I loved Amelia and how she helps Graham grow throughout the story. I loved Devin and his British accent.

I LOVED EVERYTHING.

Definitely give this book a read if you’re a geek, a nerd, or anything in between. It reads like a John Hughes movie, is filled with humor, and leaves you in love with the entire cast of characters.

 

05/12/16

A Love Letter to A COURT OF MIST AND FURY

20522640Novel: A Court of Mist and Fury (A Court of Thorns and Roses, #2) by Sarah J. Maas | Goodreads
Release Date: May 3rd, 2016
Publisher: Bloomsbury USA Children’s
Format: Hardcover
Source: Bought

Feyre survived Amarantha’s clutches to return to the Spring Court—but at a steep cost. Though she now has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can’t forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin’s people.

Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigates its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms—and she might be key to stopping it. But only if she can harness her harrowing gifts, heal her fractured soul, and decide how she wishes to shape her future—and the future of a world cleaved in two.

With more than a million copies sold of her beloved Throne of Glass series, Sarah J. Maas’s masterful storytelling brings this second book in her seductive and action-packed series to new heights.


Bit of a new style today, but this was what I needed after reading this book. Bear with me.

Dear A Court of Mist and Fury,

You are the book I want to write.

I’ve dreamed for a long time about writing the perfect book that evokes all of the right emotions in the right way with the right characters and the right plot and the right writing, and then you came along. And you showed me that my idea of a perfect book…it doesn’t exist. Instead, there are the right books. The right kind of books for the right kind of people. The book that someone will read and it will take over their life.

The one thing that I know, though, is I want to write a book that makes someone feel like the way you made me feel. As if my world have been cut in two: life and reading A Court of Mist and Fury. When I was doing my regular life things (studying for AP Statistics) all I wanted to be doing was reading you. I had to go to the gym, so I read you while I was working out. And then I almost started sobbing on the elliptical at six in the morning and drew some stares, but it was worth it.

I spent about six hours reading you. All 640 pages of you. I stormed through you, drinking up the words, begging for it to never end and to find some type of resolution in the ending that I knew would come.

And you gave me resolution, but you also tore my heart in two at the end. You tore my heart in half and stomped on it and set it on fire with Feyre’s powers, letting the smoke curl up into the night sky of the Night Court. You let Cassian kill it with his blades and Mor give it one of her smiles and Amren spit blood on it and Azriel give it a good long stare and Rhys mutilate it into a million tiny pieces.

And I loved every second of it.

Enough to put myself through it all again (because I’m rereading it. Now.)

I could go on and on about you. I could talk about you until there were no more hours left and my throat was raw. But let me start by saying this: thank you. Thank you for being a story I could lose every part of my life in, for consuming me. Thank you for your characters who became a part of my life, who I saw when I looked up every once and a while to see if it was time for me to eat something. Thank you for taking everything I love about reading and turning it into a book. You made me remember why I read, why I write, and why I want to do this with my life.

Feyre, your power and your will to live and live beautifully and powerfully made my open my eyes to the reality of life. That you don’t have to have some illustrious career or change the world, you just have to be happy. To always strive to be happy, to always look for a way to be happy. And get away from the people who are going to suck the life out of you.

Rhys, you showed me love. You showed me what love and loyalty and never-ending strength means. You showed me in the way you looked at your lands, in the way you gazed at Feyre, in the way you loved your friends fiercely and without question. Your trust in the people you cared for is something I will always hold dear.

Amren, Mor, Azriel, and Cassian. You made this book so much more. You showed what a family is. A family of happiness. Of trust. Of loyalty. Of fierce love that never ends. You made me laugh, cry, and want to write your words all over my body.

And now, obviously, to Sarah J. Maas: you are a wonder. This book is a wonder. It’s utterly beautiful and made me feel every emotion I’ve ever known and I don’t know what to do with myself now. So I’m just rereading it because I don’t know how I will ever get over it. Thank you for writing this book and for writing these characters and for continuing this series…because if you left me with that ending I would smash YOUR arm into pieces just like Rhys.

A Court of Mist and Fury, you will be joining Jellicoe Road in my suitcase to college in the fall. You are that treasured.

All my love,

Willa.

 

05/9/16

Book Review: A Darker Shade of Magic

20522640Novel: A Darker Shade of Magic (Shades of Magic, #1) by V.E. Schwab | Goodreads
Release Date: February 24th, 2015
Publisher: TorBooks
Format: Paperback
Source: Bought

Kell is one of the last Antari, a rare magician who can travel between parallel worlds: hopping from Grey London — dirty, boring, lacking magic, and ruled by mad King George — to Red London — where life and magic are revered, and the Maresh Dynasty presides over a flourishing empire — to White London — ruled by whoever has murdered their way to the throne, where people fight to control magic, and the magic fights back — and back, but never Black London, because traveling to Black London is forbidden and no one speaks of it now.

Officially, Kell is the personal ambassador and adopted Prince of Red London, carrying the monthly correspondences between the royals of each London. Unofficially, Kell smuggles for those willing to pay for even a glimpse of a world they’ll never see, and it is this dangerous hobby that sets him up for accidental treason. Fleeing into Grey London, Kell runs afoul of Delilah Bard, a cut-purse with lofty aspirations. She robs him, saves him from a dangerous enemy, then forces him to take her with him for her proper adventure.

But perilous magic is afoot, and treachery lurks at every turn. To save both his London and the others, Kell and Lila will first need to stay alive — a feat trickier than they hoped.

I’ve been wanting to read ADSOM since it came out. Partly because the cover is gorgeous (and that’s how I make my reading decisions – no shame) and partly because I’d heard such incredible things about not only ADSOM but also Victoria Schwab (whose pen name is V.E Schwab). Once I finally convinced myself to buy it, I was fully converted.

A Darker Shade of Magic is ten tons of awesome.

From the magical world to the incredible writing to the multiple perspectives done well, it’s one of the best fantasy books I’ve read of late. It’s slightly urban fantasy, which makes it even better – there are three Londons – Red, Grey, and White, and so the landscape of London is very prevalent in the story. However, the memorable sights of London are named different things which reflect the different Londons, an element that really enhanced the world-building.

One of the best parts of the book though was the intense friendship built between Kell and Lila. (Side note: LILA IS SO KICKASS I LOVE IT.) They deeply trust one another, and it’s quickly discovered that they will do anything for one another. Time and time again it’s proven that when everything is about to fall apart,Kell will show up to save Lila, and vice versa. I loved reading about them slowly gaining one another’s trust, and also growing to respect one another’s opinions and choices.

V.E. Schwab also does an incredible job with the multiple perspectives that occur in the book. It’s told in third person and jumps around perspectives, from the shadows to Kell, to Lila, and other minor characters in the book. This writing style really enhanced the story, I think, and definitely added to my enjoyment.

I also need to address Rhys and Kell, because their brotherhood was FAN-FREAKING TASTIC. I want more.

Also, I severely wanted some romance.

V.E. Schwab, give me some romance, please.

Now I shall go drown my sorrows and try to get my hands on a copy of book two, A Gathering of Shadows.